Eating Less – The Solution To Many Problems


Eating Less – avoiding Obesity

By Asma bint Shameem

I feel really tired! I can’t get up for Fajr! I just don’t have the energy to go to the Halaqas!
I just don’t have Khushoo’ in my Salah! I don’t know why I yawn so much during my prayers! I can’t seem to lose weight! I’ve tried all the diets but nothing works!

Do these remarks sound familiar? Do they remind you of someone?
Do you realize, O Brother/Sister in Islaam, that these conditions are caused by nothing but…..EATING TOO MUCH!
Eating too much is the root of much of the problems we have today. We don’t need to eat more than a few bites to stay alive and fit.

The Prophet (pbuh) said:

“The son of Adam does not fill any vessel worse than his stomach. It is sufficient for the son of Adam to eat a few morsels to keep him alive. If he must fill it, then one-third for his food, one-third for his drink, and one-third for air.” (al-Tirmidhi –saheeh by al-Albaani)

Not only is it bad for the bodily health of an individual, overeating is equally bad, rather worse, for his spiritual health and wellbeing, as well as for his Aakhira.

Abu Juhayfah said:

“A man burped in the presence of the Messenger of Allaah (pbuh) and he said: “Keep your burps away from us, for the one who eats his fill the most in this world will be hungry for the longest time on the Day of Resurrection.” (al-Tabaraani–Saheeh)

After hearing that Abu Juhayfah did not eat his fill until he departed from this world; if he ate breakfast he would not eat dinner and if he ate dinner he would not eat breakfast, and he said: “I have not filled my stomach for thirty years.”

Yet, we force our kids to eat, to finish their plate or just simply stuff themselves until they are full. And we do the same ourselves. What we don’t realize is that, not only is this bad for health, and against the wise teachings of our beloved Prophet (pbuh), but it is this excessive eating that is keeping us away from the sincere and focused worship of Allaah that we are searching for…..that Khushoo’….that Sakeena, the peace that should be there in all our Ibadaat.

This is because eating one’s fill makes the body heavy, which leads to yawning and laziness in worship and work. All of us can speak from our experiences in Ramadaan, when the worship of Allaah becomes heavy and laborious, if we eat too much.

The Prophet (pbuh) said,

“A believer eats in one intestine (is satisfied with a little food), and a kafir (unbeliever) or a hypocrite eats in seven intestines (eats too much).” (Bukhaari)

If a person eats too much, he becomes sluggish and sleeps a great deal, and wastes a lot of his time. Sufyaan al-Thawri said: If you want your body to be healthy and to sleep less, then eat less.
Eating too much also makes the heart hard and heedless of Allaah.
It was said to Imam Ahmad: Does a man find any softness and humility in his heart when he is full? He said, “I do not think so.”

And that is why the Prophet (pbuh) and his companions used to go hungry quite frequently, even in the presence of abundant food.

Umm-ul-Momineen Aisha said:

“From the time of their arrival in Madina up until his death, the family of Muhammad never ate their fill of bread made from wheat three nights in a row.” (Bukhaari)

Some people argue that as long as what they are eating is Halaal, they can eat whatever they want, whenever they want and in whatever quantity they want.
But Allaah condemns everyone who is extravagant, even in things that are permissible:

“and eat and drink but waste not by extravagance, certainly He (Allaah) likes not those who waste by extravagance” [al-A’raaf 7:31]

Umar (RA) said: By Allaah, if I wanted I could wear the finest clothes among you, and eat the best food, and have the most luxurious life. But I heard that Allaah will condemn people for some of their actions and said:

“You received your good things in the life of the world, and you took your pleasure therein. Now this Day you shall be recompensed with a torment of humiliation, because you were arrogant in the land without a right, and because you used to rebel against Allaah’s Command (disobey Allaah)” [al-Ahqaaf 46:20]

Ibrahim ibn Adham said: “Any one who controls his stomach is in control of his deen, and anyone who controls his hunger is in control of good behavior.. Disobedience towards Allah is nearest to a person who is satiated with a full stomach, and furthest away from a person who is hungry.”

The Ulama enumerate multiple benefits of eating in moderation. Eating less keeps the body healthy and light, keeps the heart soft, increases memory, weakens desires, and disciplines the soul while excessive eating brings about the opposite of these praiseworthy qualities..
Haatim al-Taa’iy said: “If you give your stomach and your private part what they ask for, you will end up regretting it.” (Fath al-Baari)

In fact, the Ulama say that if a person eats so much food that it harms him, then this is haraam.. (Islam-qa)
That is because anything that harms is not allowed in Islaam. Allaah says:

“Do not kill yourself….” (Surat al-Nisaa’ 4:29)

Also, the Prophet (pbuh) said: “There should be no harming or reciprocating harm.”

A Muslim considers his food and drink means to something else. They are not a goal and pleasure in themselves. He eats and drinks in order to keep his body healthy so that he may worship Allah the Almighty. This is the worship that will make him qualified for the honor of the life and happiness of the Hereafter. He does not eat and drink for the sake of eating and drinking itself or its desires. Therefore, if he is not hungry, he does not eat. If he is not thirsty, he does not drink.

Allah’s Messenger (pbuh) said:
“We are a people who do not eat until we are hungry. And if we eat, we do not eat to our fill.”

And the wisdom behind whatever the Prophet (pbuh) said or did 1400 years ago is being proven now with science, and it shows the truthfulness of his Prophethood and the beauty and excellence of our Deen, al-Islaam, the perfect way of life.

The weight loss industry is a multi-billion dollar business. Obesity is a major American tragedy, affecting millions of people of all ages. Overeating is leading people to a variety of illnesses; from heart disease to diabetes, arthritis to asthma, from nightmares and insomnia to depression and anxiety, just to name a few.

The way to stop eating too much is to stop gradually. If a person is used to eating a lot and he stops all of a sudden and starts eating very little, he will become weak and his appetite will increase. So he should reduce it gradually, by eating less and less of his usual food, until he reaches a moderate intake of food.

When it comes to eating better, less is definitely more. And besides… eating less is the perfect way to lose those extra pounds we have been trying (futily) to shed for years.
While we were trying so hard and looking every place under the sun to lose that weight, we forgot to look right under our noses…..

We forgot that the best and most perfect diet is to follow the Sunnah of the Prophet (pbuh). For, indeed, it is only his way that is the best and his guidance that is perfect.

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Seven Ways You Can Save the Planet


Seven Ways You Can Save the Planet

Shehnaz Toorawa

Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him, said, “The world is green and beautiful and God has appointed you as His stewards over it. He sees how you acquit yourselves…” (Muslim).

Allah tells us in numerous verses of the Quran, that He has
created everything on Earth—animals, rain, plants, oceans, stars, the
sun, the moon—for the benefit of humans. With these favours comes the
role of Khalifah, or guardianship. The Quran tells us,

He it is Who has placed you as viceroys of the earth and has exalted
some of you in rank above others, that He may try you by (the test of) that
which He has given you
” (6:165).

Today the planet is in a mess. Deforestation, desertification,
water pollution, air pollution, soil erosion, extinction of species and the
dwindling of resources indicate that humans are not fulfilling their role of
Khalifah adequately.

What can we do to fulfill our responsibility to protect the Earth? Here are seven small, but effective steps each of us can take to begin the process:

1. Buy less, consume less, waste less.

On average, an individual in a developed nation consumes twice
as much grain, twice as much fish, three times as much meat, nine times as much paper, and eleven times as much gasoline as an individual in a developing nation.(1)

Yet, shopping malls, TV commercials, flyers, billboards, and
the fashion industry continually tell us we don’t have enough and we need
to buy more. The 12 percent of the world’s population that lives in North
America and Western Europe accounts for 60 percent of the world’s private
consumption spending.(2)

The Quran correctly describes our materialistic society in the verse,

The mutual rivalry for piling up (the good things of this world) diverts you (from the more serious things) until you visit the graves” (102:1-2).

While North Americans squander wealth and waste it in luxuries, 825 million people in the world are undernourished (3), 2.4 billion live without basic sanitation, and one billion lack adequate shelter.(4) Destruction of forests, desertification of grasslands, water pollution, depletion of fossil fuels, and the collapse of fisheries around the world warn us that the world’s resources are limited—certainly not enough to support the lifestyle habits of an average North American.

In the Quran, God warns us not to take more than our share of the world’s resources:
“…Do not squander (your wealth) wastefully. Surely the squanderers
are the fellows of the Devils
” (17:26).

In a world of limited resources, we have an obligation to resist consumer culture and squelch the urge to buy, consume, and eventually waste.

The words of the Prophet (pbuh) are a beautiful example of how to live:
Be in the world as if you were a stranger or a traveller along a path” (Bukhari).
The best livelihood is the bare minimum” (Ahmad).

The Quran reminds us that we will be accountable for every item we own and resource we use:
Then (on the day of judgement) you will certainly be questioned about
all the favours you enjoyed
” (102:8).

Next time you’re in line at the cash register, ask yourself if you really need what you’re buying or if you can live without it.

2. Reduce your shower time to five minutes.

The Prophet (pbuh) said, “Excess in the use of water is forbidden, even if you have the resources of a whole river” (Tirmidhi).

Ever noticed how long you spend in the shower? A five-minute shower consumes 100 litres of water. (5)
That may not sound like much, but consider that less than one half of one percent of all water on Earth is fresh water for human use. The rest is sea water or frozen in polar ice caps.(6) Every person on Earth has a share in this water, yet 20% of the world’s population already lacks access to an adequate supply of clean drinking water.(7)
While the average Canadian uses 335 litres of water per day, the average sub-Saharan African survives on 10-20 litres per day.(8) 

The Prophet (pbuh) would perform ghusl, a complete bath, with one Sa’
of water—that’s just 1.6 litres. In a world where water scarcity
and pollution are increasing, every drop counts.

3. Buy locally grown food, without the packaging

Where does the food you eat come from? The local farm or a land far away? In the United States, the average food item travels 2,500–4,000 kilometers.(9) The farther food travels before it reaches your plate, the less money the rural farmer retains.

Multinational corporations that haul, package, and process the food collect a larger portion of the profit.

The farther food travels, the more energy it consumes for pesticides, preservatives, ripening, packaging, processing, transportation and sales. Eating local food results in a healthier diet, more equitable profit distribution,
less energy consumption and less environmental pollution.

4. Take the transit or walk more often

Cars not only guzzle the world’s dwindling supply of fossil
fuels, but the burning of those fuels contributes to urban smog, acid rain,
and other air quality problems. Cars produce large volumes of carbon dioxide
and other greenhouse gases that contribute to climate change. The average car
produces about 2.4 kilograms of CO2 for every litre of gasoline‚ or three
to four times its own weight in CO2 every year. (10)

This means more air pollution, more extreme weather and storms, more water contamination and more diseases.

Public transit, cycling or walking are simple ways to reduce energy consumption, improve air quality and lead a healthier lifestyle. If you
normally drive to work, take the transit once a week for a refreshing change.

5. Install energy-saving bulbs and appliances in your home

North Americans consume 30% of the world’s energy—an amount similar to that consumed collectively by all developing countries, holding
more than 80% of the world’s population. While we may flick the light
switch without a second thought, 2 billion people in the world lack access to
electricity or other modern energy supplies.(11)

While it may be impossible for North Americans to forego the luxuries of electricity, heat, stoves, dishwashers and microwaves, we can reduce
our energy consumption through efficiency. Europeans have done it—although
they lead a similar lifestyle, people in the United States and Canada consume
2.4 times as much energy at home as those in Western Europe. (12)

Home appliances are the world’s fastest-growing energy consumers after
automobiles, accounting for 30 percent of industrial countries’ electricity
consumption.(13) The good news is that energy-efficient lighting and appliances have become common in the North American market. Making your home energy efficient is an easy and effective way to reduce energy consumption without sacrificing convenience.

6. Eat more vegetables

Vegetables capture energy for growth directly from a renewable source—the sun, while meat production in industrial countries requires a high input of non-renewable fossil fuel energy. When farmers raise animals on pasture, they require little grain, consume little energy and their manure becomes valuable agricultural fertilizer.

Today, in most industrial nations, rather than being pasture-fed, corporations raise animals in factory farms that consume huge quantities of grain, water, hormones, and electricity and produce tonnes of toxic wastes. Producing one calorie of beef or poultry requires 11–17 calories of feed.(14) Producing 8 ounces of beef requires 25,000 litres of water.(15)

This means that a diet high in grain-fed meat requires two to four times more
land than a vegetarian diet. Health is another consideration—the crowded
conditions of factory farms along with an absence of waste recycling make livestock easy targets for disease.

The Prophet (pbuh) allowed us to eat meat and, like all other foods, meat is one of Allah’s favours that He permits us to enjoy.

However, we need to apply the principle of moderation, a key aspect of the Prophet’s (pbuh) lifestyle, in our diet. Eating more vegetables, without abandoning meat, can make a significant difference in the amount of natural resources each of us consumes.

Next time you bite into that steak, think of the energy that went into producing it.

7. Recycle and compost

Canadians generate approximately 1.7 kg of waste per person per day.(16) When we use recycled materials along with recycling and composting our household waste, we significantly reduce our energy consumption and waste production.

Producing aluminium from recycled material, for example, requires 95 percent less energy than manufacturing it from raw materials.(17) Keep in mind that having a recycling box or a compost bin doesn’t justify consuming more and wasting more.

Reducing consumption is still the best way to reduce our impact on the environment.

Where do you Stand? Calculate Your Ecological Footprint

The ecological footprint is a tool that assesses the environmental
impact of an individual, a region or an activity. Your ecological footprint
indicates the amount of biologically productive land area required to support
your lifestyle based on the amount of resources you use and the amount of wastes you produce.

Calculations show that the planet has available 1.9 hectares of
biologically productive land per person to supply resources and absorb wastes—yet the average person on Earth already uses 2.3 hectares worth.

These “ecological footprints” range from 9.7 hectares claimed by the average American to 0.47 hectares used by the average Mozambican.(18)

Calculate your ecological footprint and discover your impact on the planet at
http://www.redefiningprogress.org/.
The results may shock you!

Muhammad (saws): A Role Model for a New Millennium


The human need for role models
Have you ever heard of Moses, Jesus, Confucius, Krishna or the Buddha? How about Gandhi, Mother Theresa or Martin Luther King? If you live in the West, there’s a good chance that you know a bit about these people and their accomplishments. In man’s eternal search for immortality and meaning, many leaders and heroes, both true and false, have made their appearance on the world stage. The respect and reverence shown to such figures among people of every nationality, in every age, points to a deep human need to believe in someone greater than oneself, in an attempt to transcend the confines of one’s own limited existence. We see this theme recur in world myths, legends, hero stories, and in the idealisation of people who have been raised by their followers to superhuman or godly status.
Most educated people today are sceptics,
and view such stories as the charming remnants of a simpler age. And with globalisation and the steady stream of new religions and ideologies that people are exposed to, it may be hard to know what to believe. Some find it easier to ignore spiritual questions altogether, focusing instead on their relationships, careers and ‘getting ahead’. Yet we know that excessive materialism stifles the mind and spirit; despite technological advances, the deep yearning to believe in a Higher Power, true leadership, and an ultimate purpose in life remains. In this day and age, who can be trusted as a guide in both spiritual and worldly matters?
There is one leader,
still largely unknown to the West, who is an extraordinary role model that people of all backgrounds can relate to: the Prophet Muhammad. The details of Muhammad’s remarkable life have been carefully preserved and have been subjected to the scrutiny of historians, east and west. In contrast to others who have achieved renown for their accomplishments in a limited sphere of activity, Muhammad’s achievements span all major areas of life. The historian Michael H. Hart wrote:
My choice of Muhammad to lead the list of the world’s most influential persons may surprise some readers and be questioned by others, but he was the only man in history who was supremely successful on both the religious and secular levels. Hart, Michael, The 100: A Ranking of the Most Influential Persons in History.
Why does the average European or American
know so little about a man whose life was so exceptional? Irrational fears and negative propaganda, dating back to the Crusades and exaggerated by the media, have created a ‘mental block’ for many people against all things Arab or Islamic, and the two terms are often mistakenly confused. As we enter the age of the global village, is it not time for those who pride themselves on being unprejudiced, independent thinkers to put aside these mental relics from a bygone era? We invite you to take a few minutes to explore a new understanding of religious leadership, and in so doing, to catch a glimpse of a man who is loved by one-fifth of the people on this planet.
The concept of Prophethood in Islam
For a Muslim, a Prophet does not primarily imply someone able to foretell the future – although most of Muhammad’s predictions have already been fulfilled in astonishing ways – but a man sent by God to call people to repent, have faith, and dedicate their lives to doing good, thereby helping them rediscover the purpose for which they were created. Prophets are not considered to be Divine, and are not prayed to or worshipped – though they were men of outstanding character and spirituality who were protected from committing sins, performed miracles, received revelation and communed with God. Islam teaches that God is One, without partner or associate; no human being can share in any of the qualities that are unique to the Intelligent Creator and Sustainer of our vast and complex universe. Muhammad was no more than God’s honoured servant and Messenger, yet he embodied the best of human potential, and that is what continues to make him so appealing and accessible today. Last in a line of Prophets and Messengers sent by God to all people on earth – including Noah, Abraham, Moses and Jesus – who effected the large-scale transformation of individuals and society, Muhammad was unsurpassed as teacher and guide. Speaking of his own role as the last true Prophet before Judgement Day, he said:
‘The parable of me in relation to the Prophets who came before me is that of a man who built a house beautifully and well, except that one brick in its corner was missing. The people went around it and wondered at its beauty, but said: “If only that brick were put in its place!” I am that brick, and I am the last of the Prophets.’
Muhammad’s personal life
Muhammad was born in 570 AD to a noble family of Makkah, and was a descendant of the Prophet Abraham. Orphaned at six, Muhammad was a thoughtful youth who worked as a shepherd and helped his uncle with the trade caravans. As a teenager he rejected the immoral customs of his people, who had become steeped in idolatry, and joined a chivalrous order, earning the nickname ‘The Trustworthy’. At age 25 he found employment with a wealthy widow of 40 named Khadijah, managing her business. Impressed by his honesty and character, Khadijah proposed marriage and he accepted. Despite their age difference, they were happily married for 25 years, and were blessed with six children. After Khadijah’s death Muhammad married several women for political and humanitarian reasons, as was expected of a man of his position; all but one were widows and divorcees. He was a loving and considerate husband and father, and his family was devoted to him despite his voluntary poverty, for he put into practice his own advice, ‘the best of you is the one who is best to his own family.’
Muhammad, the Prophet
Muhammad received his first revelation from God at 40, through the Angel Gabriel. He continued to receive revelations for 23 years, on topics ranging from the Oneness of God and His wondrous handiwork, to stories of earlier prophets, morality and ethics, and life after death. These revelations became collectively known as the Qur’an, and are considered by Muslims to be the literal word of God; the Prophet’s own words were collected separately. Muhammad’s call to monotheism and social reform was heavily opposed by the Makkan elite; after enduring thirteen years of intense persecution, he and his followers were invited to relocate to Madinah, a town to the north that had been torn apart by generations of intertribal warfare. Muhammad successfully settled their differences and forged a bond of brotherhood between the two warring factions, as well as between the locals and the new emigrants. For Arab tribal society, this was an amazing accomplishment. The early Muslims learned to implement the golden rule under the Prophet’s tutelage: ‘No one truly believes until he desires for his brother what he desires for himself.’
Muhammad’s legacy: the Madinan model
For Muhammad, religion was not a matter of personal conviction alone but a complete way of life, and Madinah flourished under his leadership. The Madinan model of government, based on justice, respect for human dignity and God-consciousness, became the template to which Muslims have looked for guidance and inspiration ever since. The Prophet drew up the world’s first constitution in which the rights of religious minorities were protected, and entered into treaties and alliances with neighbouring tribes.
He sent letters to the rulers of the Persians, Egyptians, Abyssinians and Byzantines, announcing his message of pure monotheism and inviting them to accept Islam. For the first time in history, women, children, orphans, foreigners and slaves were granted extensive rights and protection. Many of the Prophet’s concerns seem surprisingly ‘modern’: he condemned racism and nationalism, saying ‘there is no superiority of an Arab over a non-Arab, or a white man over a black man, except in righteousness.’
He established laws protecting animals, trees and the environment. He encouraged free trade and ethical investments, but secured workers’ rights and forbade usury. He worked for peace, but defined the parameters of the judicious use of force, when force was needed. He convinced people to give up alcohol, drugs, prostitution and crime, and promoted healthy living.
He condemned domestic violence, encouraged his wives to speak their own mind, and granted Muslim women many rights not dreamed of in Europe until centuries later, including the right to own property, reject arranged marriages, and seek divorce because of incompatibility. And the Prophet encouraged his followers to seek beneficial knowledge wherever it could be found, with the result that Muslims never experienced a conflict between science and religion, and led the world in many fields of learning for centuries afterwards.
Although his enduring legacy can be observed in everything from art to politics, Muhammad’s greatest achievement by far was to re-establish pure monotheism. As simple and straightforward to understand as the nucleus at the centre of an atom, the concept of One God lies at the heart of Islamic culture. Muslims turn to their Creator for guidance, without the need for intermediaries, or the loss of dignity that idolatry and superstition bring.
The Prophet accomplished all this through the strength of his character and personal example; he inspired in his followers a love, devotion and sense of awe that was unparalleled. While other men would have been corrupted by the absolute power that he wielded in his later years, Muhammad remained humble, ever aware of the Source of his blessings. ‘I am just God’s servant,’ he said, and ‘I have only been sent as a teacher.’ Although he spent his days in serving people and his nights in prayer, he preached religious moderation and balance; he forbade his followers to adopt a monastic lifestyle and preferred that they establish strong families and engage themselves in bettering the world around them, while remaining deeply conscious of God.
In the brief space of one generation and during his own lifetime, the Prophet Muhammad* successfully transformed the faith, mentality and culture of the people of Arabia; within 100 years his message had touched the hearts and lives of millions in Africa, Asia and parts of Europe. The Prophet foretold that each succeeding generation would be worse than the one before it, and true to his prediction, Muslims have not always understood or honoured his example. But Muhammad’s teachings, speeches and customs were carefully noted down by his Companions, and compiled into books of authentic sayings which are available in translation.
Along with the Qur’an, they form the holistic foundation of a satisfying way of life for practising Muslims, while for others, they provide a fascinating glimpse into the heart and mind of an exceptional man and role model from whom much can be learned.

The Gist of Prophet(peace be upon him)’s teachings


The Gist of Prophet’s teachings

-Sheik Yusuf Estes.

There is a large collection of the Prophet’s teachings, beliefs, morals, manners and principles. The greatness and glory of Islam rests upon these ideals. Only a portion of them are listed here.

Purity of Self

1. Wise is he who regards himself small, and performs deeds that are useful after death; foolish is he who is controlled by his desires and expectant of Allah’s grace and mercy.
2. The strong man is he who controls himself, not the one who throws down his adversary.
3. Contentment is treasure that is never empty.
4. To give up the unimportant is highly religious.
5. Advice is a trust and wrong instruction is a breach of trust.
6. To give up evil or wickedness is also a charity.
7. Modesty is a branch of faith.
8. Health and comforts are blessings not available to all.
9. Moderation in spending is equal to half of one’s income. (Spending with sense is as good as half of one’s income).
10. Careful thinking is wisdom.
11. The one who keeps promises is righteous.
12. Wisdom is the greatest wealth.
13. Good speech is the charm of man.
14. Ignorance is the greatest limitation.
15. One who is trustworthy is righteous.
16. Love is not as effective as good manners.
17. Humility elevates one’s position.
18. Alms-giving does not lead to decrease of wealth.
19. Don’t mock at your brother or you might meet the same situation.
20. Bad manners spoil good qualities as vinegar spoils honey.

Obedience to Parents

1. Allah is pleased when the father is pleased. Allah is displeased when the father is displeased.
2. Of all the deeds performed, offering prayers on time is the best, and then the second in importance is obedience to parents.
3. The greatest sins are polytheism, disobedience to parents, giving false evidences and telling lies.

Behavior with Relatives

“Kinship”[ in Arabic- rahim] is derived from “The Most Beneficent” [in Arabic- rahman]. The man who maintains the bonds of kinship is close to Allah and one who severs relations with his kin is forsaken by Allah.

Bringing up Daughters

1. One who raises and educates three or two daughters or sisters, out of fear of Allah, will go to Paradise (even if the number is one).
2. Bringing up daughters is a test; one who passes the test will be safe from Hell.

Bringing up Orphans

One who brings up orphans will be with me (the Prophet  peace be upon him) like the two fingers of a hand (in the Hereafter).

Obedience to Rulers

1. The ruler should be obeyed on the earth.
2. Even if a slave happens to become your ruler, you must obey him.
3. Kingdom is lost not through disbelief, but through tyranny.

Kindness

One who is not merciful and kind cannot expect mercy upon him.

Evils of Begging

1. One who begs is collecting fire (of Hell) for himself, whether it is small or great.
2. The worst person is he who begs in the Name of Allah and still gets nothing. Don’t beg from men for Allah’s sake. It is better to demand from Allah Himself.

Cooperation

1. Those who are not kind to the young and do not respect the elders, do not belong to us.
2. Be kind to people on the earth and Allah will be Merciful in Heaven.
3. In friendliness and sympathy, the Muslims are like a building in which the bricks strengthen one another.
4. To meet cheerfully, to talk about virtues, to prevent people from vices and villainy, to show the right path to those who have lost the way, to lead weak-sighted persons on the way, to remove thorns, stones, and bones from paths and to draw water from wells for others, are all deeds of virtue.
5. To greet people and to feed the poor and to pray at night while people are asleep are the good signs of Islam.
6. Only courteous men will be close and dear to me on the Day of Judgment. I shall be disgusted and distant from those who are not well-behaved. I am also sick of those who talk nonsense, discuss things irresponsibly and are proud.
7. To live comfortably is not arrogance. Arrogance is to despise the people and to reject the truth.
8. Love all; in it is half of wisdom.
9. Don’t behave well only when others behave well and to mischief if others do mischief. Instead, try to behave well with those who behave well with you and do not create mischief if they do likewise.

The Greatness of Learning

1. One who seeks knowledge finds the road to Paradise easier.
2. Knowledge is obligatory upon every Muslim.
3. Quest for learning is atonement for past sins.
4. Learning is greater than devotion and optional prayer in importance.
5. Knowledge and wisdom are your lost treasures; seek them wherever they are.
6. He who conceals his knowledge will be chained with fire.
7. Nothing in the world is better than the collecting of knowledge and patience.

Treatment of Slaves, Women Servants and Attendants

1. Men slaves and women slaves are like your brothers and sisters. Allah has kept them under your supervision. Equal treatment is to be given to them in food and clothing. They should not be asked to bear more than their strength and capacity. In difficult tasks they should be given assistance and support.
2. To liberate men slaves or women slaves is to get liberated from Hell.

Water please!


Abu Hurairah(Allah be pleased him) reported that Allah’s Prophet (Peace be upon him) said: “On the Day of Judgment, Allah, the Exalted, will say: “.. “O son of Adam! I asked you to give water to Me, but you did not give it to Me!”The son of Adam will say: “O Allah, How come You ask me for water even though You are the Lord of the Worlds?” Allah will say: “My slave asked you for water and you refused to give him. Don’t you know that if you had given him water, i would have rewarded you?” (Reported by Muslim)

Anas reported that Sa’d(Allah be pleased him) once came to the Prophet (Peace be upon him) and said: “O Allah’s Prophet! My mother died without leaving a will, is there any benefit for her if I gave Sadaqah (alms) on her behalf ? The Prophet answered “yes, I advise you to give the Sadaqah through water.” [Reported by Al-Tabarani]

Action plan

Water is the most precious resource and we can all do our bit firstly by saving water.

1. Do an inventory for a week and see how much water you use during the day. How much water do you use:

during wudu,

brushing your teeth

watering the garden

2. Don’t leave the water running when brushing your teeth or washing your dishes,clothes.

4. When pouring water down the drain think if it could be used for something else – watering a plant or garden.

5. Verify that your home is leak free. Many homes have hidden water leaks. Read your water meter before and after a two-hour period when no water is being used. If the meter does not read exactly the same, there is a leak.

6. Repair dripping faucets/taps by replacing washers. If your faucet is dripping at a rate of one drop per second, you can expect to waste 2,700 gallons per year.

10. Carry a fresh bottle of water in the car, if you pass by a beggar or someone working hard in the sun the whole day give them the water.

11. Find out if there are areas where you stay that have scarce water resources. Work with your community or call an organization that specializes in water schemes to help them get clean water by building a borehole or water well. Donate to organizations that have specialty in building water wells and boreholes.

 

Rights Due to Parents, No Old age Home in Islam!


None can deny the parents‘ favor upon their children. The parents are the underlying reason for the existence of the child. They have reared him in his babyhood and experienced painstaking efforts to provide full comfort and sound well-being. Your mother had you in her womb while you were a parasite there sharing her food and whole being for nine months. In this context, Allah says:

“And We have enjoined on man (to be dutiful and good) to his parents. His mother bore him in weakness and hardship upon weakness and hardship…” (31:14)

It is a preliminary stage followed by incubation and breast feeding for two years marked by peculiar fatigue and hardships. The father, on his part, is meanwhile also fully engaged catering for his child and bringing him up, not sparing any sort of instructions or guidance he could provide his child with; the child, meanwhile, a helpless creature is neither harmful nor useful to himself.

Allah has always enjoined that children should be good and thankful to their parents

Allah has always enjoined that children should be good and thankful to their parents and He says:

“And We have enjoined on man (to be dutiful and good) to his parents. His mother bore him in weakness and hardship upon weakness and hardship, and his weaning is in two years – give thanks to Me and to your parents, – unto Me is the final destination.” (31:14)

“… And that you be dutiful to your parents. If one of them or both of them attain old age in your life, say not to them a word of disrespect, nor shout at them but address them in terms of honor. And lower unto them the wing of submission and humility through mercy, and say: “My Lord! Bestow on them Your Mercy as they did bring me up when I was small.” (17:23, 24)

Lower unto them the wing of submission and humility through mercy.

The right of parents upon you is to do good with them. You should be good to them physically as well as monetarily, and also with your words and your actions. You should be obedient to them unless in it there is disobedience to your Lord or there is some harm to you. Be kindhearted to them and serve them as they need your help. In their old age, in case of any ailment or weakness, never consider them a burden on you, neither speak to them harshly, because one day you will also become as old as they are. You will be a father as they are your parents and, if life permits, soon you will be an old man before your children just like your parents became old before you. So you need the help of your children as your parents need you today. If you are doing good to your parents then you must have the good news of a great reward and a better showing from your children, because whoever remained good to his parents, his children will also be good to him; and whoever annoyed his parents, will also be annoyed by his children. It is the process of recompense that deeds provide the results accordingly “as you sow, so will you reap. Allah has ranked the rights due to the parents high next only to His and the Prophet’s, Allah says:

“Worship Allah and join none with Him in worship, and do good to parents…” (4:36)

And Allah also says:

“…give thanks to Me and to your parents… (31:14)

Being dutiful to one’s parents assumes priority even over Jihad (fight in the cause of Allah) as is narrated in the tradition of Ibn Mas’ood when he asked the Prophet (p.b.u.h.):

“Which deed is most beloved by Allah?” He said, ‘Observing prayer in time.’ “And next to that?” He said: ‘Being dutiful to one’s parents.’ “And next to that?” He answered: ‘Jihad (fight in the cause of Allah).'”

This Hadith (Prophetic saying) reported by Bukhari and Muslim points directly to the significance of the rights due to one’s parents.

Unfortunately, most people have forgotten these rights, instead disobedience and severance of ties have risen to harden the hearts, and even they contempt and detest their parents. Some people have even deemed themselves superior to those two old good creatures. A recompense is sure in store for those disobedient children, sooner or later.

Good Character

This includes suppressing one’s anger, and being gentle and humble. Allah Most High has said: Surely, you are of tremendous nature, (The Holy Quran: 68/4) and: Those who suppress their anger, and forgive other people – assuredly, Allah loves those who do good. (Quran: 3/134)

Bukhari and Muslim relate that Abdullah Ibn Amr (May Allah be pleased with you) said, “The Messenger of Allah (p.b.u.h.) was never immoderate or obscene. He used to say, ‘Among those who are most beloved to me are those who have the finest character.'”

They also narrate that Aisha (May Allah be pleased with her) said, “Never was the Messenger of Allah (p.b.u.h.) given the choice between two things without choosing the easier of them, as long as it entailed no sin. If it did entail sin, he was of all people the most remote from it. Never did he seek revenge for something done against himself; but when the sanctity of Allah was challenged, he would take vengeance for His sake alone.”

The meaning of good character is the inclination of the soul towards gentle and praiseworthy acts. This may take place in one’s personal actions for Allah Most High, or in actions which involve other people. In the former case, the slave of Allah has an open and welcoming heart for His commandments and prohibitions, and does what He has imposed on him happily and easily, and abstains from the things which He has forbidden him with full contentment, and without the least dissatisfaction.

He likes to perform optional good acts, and abstains from many permitted things for the sake of Allah Most High whenever he decides that to abstain in that way would be closer to perfect slavehood to Him. This he does with a contented heart, and without feeling any resentment or hardship. When he deals with other people, he is tolerant when claiming what is his right, and does not ask for anything which is not; but he discharges all the duties which he has towards others. When he falls ill or returns from a trip, and no-one visits him, or when he gives a greeting which is not returned, or when he is a guest but is not honored, or intercedes but is not responded to, or does a good turn for which he is not thanked, or joins a group of people who do not make room for him to sit, or speaks and is not listened to, or asks permission of a friend to enter, and is not granted it, or proposes to a woman, and is not allowed to marry her, or ask for more time to repay a debt, but is not given more time, or asks for it to be reduced, but is not permitted this, and all similar cases, he does not grow angry, or seek to punish people, or feel within himself that he has been snubbed, or ignored; neither does he try to retaliate with the same treatment when able to do so, but instead tells himself that he does not mind any of these things, and responds to each one of them with something which is better, and closer to goodness and piety, and is more praiseworthy and pleasing.

He remembers to carry out his duties to others just as he remembers their duties towards himself, so that when one of his Muslim brethren falls ill he visits him, if he is asked to intercede, he does so, if he is asked for a respite in repaying a debt he agrees, and if someone needs assistance he gives it, and if someone asks for favorable terms in a sale, he consents, all without looking to see how the other person had dealt with him in the past, and to find out how other people behave. Instead, he makes “what is better” the imam of his soul, and obeys it completely.

Good character may be something which a man is born with, or it may be acquired. However, it may only be acquired from someone who has it more firmly rooted in his nature than his own.

Among those who are most beloved to me are those who have the finest character. – Prophet Muhammad(pbuh)

It is well known that a man of sensible opinion can become even more sensible by keeping the company of intelligent and sensible people, and that a learned or a righteous man can learn even more by sitting with other people of learning or righteousness; therefore it cannot be denied that a man of beautiful character may acquire an even more beautiful character by being with people whose characters are superior to his own.

And Allah gives success!

The Arrogance of Abu Lahab towards the Prophet (Peace be upon him)


In the name of Allah, The Most Gracious, The Most Merciful

This man Abu Lahab was one of the uncles of the Messenger of Allah. His name was `Abdul-`Uzza bin Abdul-Muttalib. His surname was Abu `Utaybah and he was only called Abu Lahab because of the brightness of his face. He used to often cause harm to the Messenger of Allah (peace be upon him). He hated and scorned him and his religion.

Imam Ahmad recorded from Abu Az-Zinad that a man called Rabi`ah bin `Abbad from the tribe of Bani Ad-Dil, who was a man of pre-Islamic ignorance who accepted Islam, said to him, “I saw the Prophet in the time of pre-Islamic ignorance in the market of Dhul-Majaz and he was saying,

(O people! Say there is no god worthy of worship except Allah and you will be successful.)

The people were gathered around him and behind him there was a man with a bright face, squint (or cross) eyes and two braids in his hair. He was saying, “Verily, he is an apostate (from our religion) and a liar!” This man was following him (the Prophet) around wherever he went. So, I asked who was he and they (the people) said, “This is his uncle, Abu Lahab.”

Al-Bukhari recorded from Ibn `Abbas that the Prophet (peace be upon him) went out to the valley of Al-Batha and he ascended the mountain. Then he cried out,

(O people, come at once!)

So the Quraysh gathered around him. Then he said,

(If I told you all that the enemy was going to attack you in the morning, or in the evening, would you all believe me)

They replied, “Yes.” Then he said,

(Verily, I am a warner (sent) to you all before the coming of a severe torment.)

Then Abu Lahab said, “Have you gathered us for this May you perish!” Thus, Allah revealed,

﴿تَبَّتْ يَدَآ أَبِى لَهَبٍ وَتَبَّ – مَآ أَغْنَى عَنْهُ مَالُهُ وَمَا كَسَبَ – سَيَصْلَى نَاراً ذَاتَ لَهَبٍ – وَامْرَأَتُهُ حَمَّالَةَ الْحَطَبِ – فِى جِيدِهَا حَبْلٌ مِّن مَّسَدٍ ﴾

“Perish the two hands of Abu Lahab (an uncle of the Prophet), and perish he!

His wealth and his children (etc.) will not benefit him!

He will be burnt in a Fire of blazing flames!

And his wife too, who carries wood (thorns of Sadan which she used to put on the way of the Prophet (Peace be upon him), or use to slander him).

In her neck is a twisted rope of Masad (palm fibre).”

(Qur’an 111:1-5)

In another narration it states that he stood up dusting of his hands and said,

“Perish you for the rest of this day! Have you gathered us for this”

Then Allah revealed,

(Perish the two hands of Abu Lahab and perish he!)

The first part is a supplication against him and the second is information about him.

Concerning Allah’s statement,

(His wealth and his children (Kasab) will not benefit him!)

Ibn `Abbas and others have said, (and his children (Kasab) will not benefit him!) “Kasab means his children.” A similar statement has been reported from `A’ishah, Mujahid, `Ata’, Al-Hasan and Ibn Sirin. It has been mentioned from Ibn Mas`ud that when the Messenger of Allah called his people to faith, Abu Lahab said, “Even if what my nephew says is true, I will ransom myself (i.e., save myself) from the painful torment on the Day of Judgement with my wealth and my children.”

Thus, Allah revealed,

(His wealth and his children will not benefit him!)

Then Allah says,

(He will enter a Fire full of flames!)

meaning, it has flames, evil and severe burning.

Source:Tafsir Ibn Kathir